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FAQs - Gaming


Charitable Gaming Registration FAQs

1. What does "charitable gaming" refer to?

Charitable gaming refers to gaming events that are conducted and managed by a licensed charitable or religious organization. Typical games include bingo, raffles, social gaming events, bazaars and break-open tickets.

2. Who is required to register?

Two main classes of person or business must be registered under the Gaming Control Act, 1992: suppliers and gaming assistants.

Suppliers to the charitable gaming sector include operators of gaming sites (e.g. bingo halls), sellers of break open tickets, suppliers of equipment or services for charitable gaming events, manufacturers of gaming equipment, bingo paper or break open tickets for charitable gaming events, and trade unions representing gaming assistants at bingo halls.

Gaming assistants employed in the charitable gaming sector include persons who act as managers or callers at a bingo hall, deal cards at a social gaming event or fair or exhibition or provide other charitable gaming-related services.

3. What are the eligibility criteria for registration and how old do I have to be?

Registrants must be at least eighteen (18) years of age and must meet high standards of honesty, integrity and financial responsibility.

The AGCO employs a risk-based approach to the processing of applications for gaming registrations. For more information about risk-based registration, please see   Information Bulletin No. 68 - AGCO Implements Risk-based Registration to Process Gaming Registrations.

4. Are officers, directors, shareholders and principal employees of suppliers required to register?

No. However, they are required to complete a Personal Disclosure Form, and if they do not meet high standards of honesty, integrity and financial responsibility, the supplier may be refused registration.

Note that a shareholder is defined to mean the owner of 5% or more of any shares of the applicant corporation.

5. If I am registered as a gaming assistant for purposes of charitable gaming events, do I need a separate registration to start working in the casino or lottery sector?

No. A single registration allows an individual or business to supply goods and services to all sectors of the gaming industry in Ontario. However, the AGCO maintains records and conducts an eligibility review based on a risk assessment which includes the type of goods or services provided and the sector in which an individual is employed. For these purposes, if you are already registered and plan to start working in a new or different sector, notice to the AGCO must be provided.

6. If I am registered as a supplier to the charitable gaming sector, do I need a separate registration to start supplying casinos or the OLG lottery sector?

No. A single registration allows an individual or business to supply goods or services to all sectors of the gaming industry in Ontario. However, the AGCO maintains records and conducts an eligibility review based on a risk assessment which includes the type of goods or services provided and the sector being supplied. For these purposes, if you are already registered and plan to start providing goods and services to a new or different sector, notice to the AGCO must be provided.